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    Splunk 2020 Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Annual Report

    Data is key to navigating global challenges, expanding inclusivity and achieving our goals so that everyone can thrive.

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    Introduction

    A year of transformations

    2020 was a year defined by the pandemic, the social justice movement, climate change, and political and economic uncertainty — all of which impacted women and marginalized groups hardest. As this report will demonstrate, these global challenges also underscored and accelerated our commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion so that no person or group is left behind. As the Data-to-Everything company, we know that data will be key to navigating some of the world’s toughest problems so that everyone thrives in the Data Age. In our second Diversity Annual Report, we provide a candid reflection on where we have made progress in 2020 and where we have work to do. 

     

    Our report outlines a strategy built on three pillars: growing a diverse workforce; nurturing our culture of inclusion in the workplace; and driving positive change in the marketplace for Splunkers, customers, partners and the world. The data we share will shine a light on our Million Data Points culture of inclusion while also highlighting opportunities for us to learn, grow and become even more equitable and inclusive.

    WORKFORCE

    Shifting to a virtual environment

    In 2020, we moved quickly to support Splunkers' transition to all-remote work environments, which has also allowed us to attract talent from new locations. While COVID-19 temporarily shuttered our offices worldwide, the number of team members working from home on a full-time basis, versus having an assigned office presence, grew to 31%, up from 27% the previous year.

    The representation of people identifying as women at Splunk increased overall, especially in leadership and people manager roles. The representation of underrepresented groups also rose, with percentages of U.S.-based Black, Indigenous, and multiracial employees all increasing from the previous year.

    Gender (Global)
    Men
    Women
    Race/Ethnicity (U.S.)
    Asian
    Black
    Indigenous
    LatinX
    Multiracial
    White

    We’re pleased to see overall increases in representation for Black/African American men and women, as well as a slight increase in representation for Latinx women. Representation of Black and Indigenous men increased in leadership positions, and representation of Black and Indigenous men and women, and Latinx women, increased in people-manager roles.

    Race/Ethnicity (U.S.)
    Women
    Men
    Asian
    Women
    Men
    Black
    Women
    Men
    Indigenous
    Women
    Men
    LatinX
    Women
    Men
    Multiracial
    Women
    Men
    White
    Women
    Men

    We were proud to see consistent hiring and representation increases of employees who identify as women and Black, as well as small increases in Indigenous hires — indications that many of our diversity efforts are paying off. But we also recognize that Latinx employee hiring and representation was down in 2020, showing us that we still have work to do.

    Gender (Global)
    Men
    Women
    Race/Ethnicity (U.S.)
    Asian
    Black
    Indigenous
    LatinX
    Multiracial
    White

    Overall, we saw encouraging increases in hiring for Black men, Latinx women, and women who identify as multiracial, as well as incremental increases for Indigenous men and women. Also encouragingly, we saw a rise in hiring in Indigenous and Latinx women in both leadership and people-manager positions, as well as hiring increases for Black and Indigenous men and women, and Latinx and multiracial women, in technical roles.

    Race/Ethnicity (U.S.)
    Women
    Men
    Asian
    Women
    Men
    Black
    Women
    Men
    Indigenous
    Women
    Men
    LatinX
    Women
    Men
    Multiracial
    Women
    Men
    White
    Women
    Men

    In response to rising attrition of women and Black employees in 2019, we accelerated our focus on career development and sponsorship for both groups. Our efforts paid off, and we’re pleased to show an improvement in the retention of both women and Black employees in 2020.

    Gender (Global)
    Overall Global Attrition=100
    women
    93
    men
    103
    Race/Ethnicity (U.S.)
    Overall U.S. Attrition=100
    Asian
    84
    Black
    97
    Indigenous
    121
    LatinX
    119
    Multiracial
    67
    White
    107
    Our most recent Federal Employer Information Report EEO-1, representing Splunk employees as of Dec. 31, 2018, is publicly available here. However, we believe the information we sharein our Diversity Annual Report more accurately represents our year-over-year progress, while providing a more holistic pictureof our culture of diversity and inclusion.
    Download the UK Gender Pay Gap Report here.

    This report contains Splunk’s own data — including, but not limited to, gender, ethnicity and race — that allows us to determine our progress and see where we want to improve. In this report, we cover our fiscal year of Feb. 1, 2020, through Jan. 31, 2021. Figures are based on self-identification data only, and we’ve rounded each data label to the nearest tenth of a point. Gender data is from Splunk employees around the world (0.2% of employees globally have declined to disclose their gender). All race and ethnicity data apply to U.S.-based employees only (13.9% of employees in the United States have declined to disclose their race/ethnicity). If employees who chose not to disclose their demographic information elect to do so in the future, this will change our historical representation figures.

    1. Underrepresented groups in the U.S. technology industry are defined as Black, Hispanic or Latinx, Native American and multiracial people. Race/ethnicity data refers to the EEO-1 race/ethnicity categories established by the U.S. government.

    2. Technical roles include engineering, design, product, QA, data analytics, information technology and some consulting roles.

    3. Non-technical is defined as all employees whose roles are not considered technical.

    4. People manager is defined as employees who have at least one full-time direct report.

    5. We define leadership as director-level or above, in line with industry definitions. When we report on leadership trends in this report, we’re comparing director and above, year-over-year.

    6. To evaluate retention, we compared the retention rate of each group to the company average and set the average to an index of 100.

    WORKPLACE

    A focus on inclusion

    As the pandemic compelled us to rapidly move to an all-virtual work environment, our strong and thriving ecosystem of employee resource groups (ERGs) became critical sources of support for Splunkers, providing a foundation for community, advocacy and connection during troubling times. Our Neurodiversity ERG launched weekly virtual mindfulness sessions while partnering with our benefits team to promote and evangelize new, dedicated mental health and wellness offerings throughout Splunk. And our Pride ERG expanded its advocacy and inclusion efforts by driving the implementation of all-gender restrooms in Splunk’s global offices and helped establish the company’s first LGBTQ Trans and Non-Binary Support Guide.

     

    To address global race and social injustice issues as a company, we:

     

    • Facilitated ERG-led listening sessions to better understand lived experiences of Splunkers from underrepresented groups. 
    • Created an accelerated DEI roadmap and the Splunk Commitment to Racial Equity and Social Justice for All, reinforcing that racism and social injustice have no place at Splunk. 
    • Announced a commitment to removing institutionalized bias and negative stereotypes from our products.  
    • Appointed our first Black member, retired four-star Gen. Dennis Via, to our Board of Directors.
    • And we are continually developing stronger allyship practices that help Splunkers better listen, understand and uplift each other.
    workplace workplace
    marketplace marketplace

    Marketplace

    Investing in our values

    As the pandemic surfaced inequities in nearly every aspect of society, we mobilized our technology, expertise and charitable contributions to support organizations that address these disparities and reflect Splunk’s value of equity. Many of our efforts were recognized with industry awards, including Fortune's World's Most Admired Companies 2021, the HRC 2021 Corporate Equality Index: Best Places to Work for LGBTQ Equality, Fortune's Best Workplaces for Women 2020, and Great Place to Work’s Best Workplaces for Parents 2020.

     

    Our charitable contributions included:

     

    Our Commitment

    Moving forward

    Looking ahead, we recognize that data continues to be essential in helping us meet our goals as we forge a new path in a post-pandemic world. That includes confronting the many social justice, racial and economic challenges further exposed by the global health crisis. Through our Splunk for Good team, we are working to find sustainable solutions to these global problems. A top priority is having organizations use data-driven strategies in their efforts to advance a more equitable future. 

     

    We are also committed to increasing representation and retention for all underrepresented groups, narrowing opportunity gaps and finding new ways to increase equity for all. While we recognize that there is a lot to learn, we are excited about the future and our potential to help build a more inclusive and equitable workplace, industry and world so that everyone thrives in the Data Age.

    our commitment our commitment

    We are committed to each other’s success.
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